Death on the Nile – A Review


Death on the Nile – 2022

Now that the Covid pandemic is somewhat waning, perhaps it is time to venture out into the general population to enjoy a bit of entertainment from the big screen., albeit while still wearing a face covering to prevent getting or spreading this hideous virus. And although there is a plethora of movies that have come out recently, some that were put on a shelf until the Covid subsided, there is one that I enjoyed very much – Death on the Nile.

The movie is a cat and mouse thriller based on a novel by the extremely talented Dame Agatha Christy and was put together by the enormously talented Kenneth Branagh who not only directed this movie but produced it and played the leading role of world famous detective, Hercule Poirot. For his lifetime of achievements, Kenneth Branagh was appointed a Knight Bachelor in the 2012 Birthday Honours and knighted on November 9, 2012.


The setting is in Egypt, along the Nile of course, and on a luxury cruise ship filled with eccentric passengers. Some are uber wealthy, some have lost their fortunes, some have inherited wealth, and some are paving the road to gain wealth. And each are considered a suspect until the very end. And in the end you might find yourself saying, “I suspected so-and-so all along.” But did you really?


I must admit at this point that I have never read any of Dame Agatha Christies novels, nor have I ever watched the original 1978 film version that starred Peter Ustinov, although I plan to. Neither have I watched a single episode on PBS of the Poirot series that starred David Suchet. I can also say that I have never watched John Malkovich in his role as Hercule Poirot, in The ABC Murders. However, I did watch and enjoy very much the star-studded thriller Murder on the Orient Express which Kenneth Branagh also starred as Hercule Poirot as well as producing and directing it. This excellent film persuaded me to watch Death on the Nile.


The cast of the 2022 version of Death on the Nile is filled with talented artists who have impressive resumes. Their acting styles befit the character they play and none have that typical urge to overact their roles. Perhaps that is due to the high quality standard that Kenneth Branagh sets or because of his complex OCD on the set, or simply because the actors are consummate professionals. Perhaps it is all of the above.


The music in the movie is, if I may be honest, absolutely wonderful! The elegant Sophie Okonedo, a British actress of immense talent plays the role of Salome, and in the opening scene at the “Live Music” club she performs “That’s All” a jumping blues song by Sister Rosetta Tharpe. And throughout the movie the audience is exposed to the fabulous work of Sister Rosetta Tharpe, which is long overdue for many.


Sister Rosetta Tharpe (March 20, 1915 – October 9, 1973) was an American singer and guitarist. She attained popularity in the 1930s and 1940s with her lively gospel recordings, that were characterized by a unique mixture of lyrics and electric guitar.


So, who done it? Anyone on that ship could have done it and only at the end you will find out. And you just might be surprised. And the jeweled necklace, which plays a significant role in this movie, is far more bedazzling than the one in The Titanic. And could there be a more steamy dance scene?


Quite possibly the most dashing moustache ever brandished in a movie, the viewer will come to find out the origin of that perfectly groomed facial hair that the movies hero, Hercule Poirot, sports.


Who wore the famous Poirot moustache better? Was it Peter Ustinov in his roles as Hercule Poirot in the 1978 version of Death on the Nile? Or perhaps:


David Suchet in his performance as Poirot in the television series.


Or was it John Malkovich? Or Alfred Molina?


Or was it Albert Finney? You decide but I have my opinion.


Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, in 1925, the writer of Death on the Nile

Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, also known as Lady Mallowan, DBE (née Miller; 15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976) was an English writer known for her 66 detective novels and 14 short story collections, particularly those revolving around fictional detectives Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. She also wrote the world’s longest-running play, The Mousetrap, which has been performed in the West End since 1952, as well as six novels under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott. In 1971, she was made a Dame (DBE) for her contributions to literature. Guinness World Records lists Christie as the best-selling fiction writer of all time, her novels having sold more than two billion copies. Her work is said to be outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. (This excerpt, in part, is from Wikipedia)

Whether you like the 1978 version of Death on the Nile or any version in between. I am sure that you will enjoy this latest version. It is well made, entertaining, mystifying, stealthy, glamorous, and not the least bit outlandish, well, except for a few enjoyable parts!

So get out of the house, put on the face mask, or grow an elegant moustache, and enjoy this delightfully entertaining movie, it will most certainly add another drop in the bucket!


All photographs are the copyright of their respective owners and this blog is the copyright of Jim Jackson Photography and Nida Jackson Photography. Please contact me with any questions, and/or comments.

If you found this article useful, please like, share, and follow.

Leave A Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.